Eating leafy greens can reduce your risk of oral cancer Eating leafy greens can reduce your risk of oral cancer

17 Feb

Eating leafy greens can reduce your risk of oral cancer

Research presented at the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) has shown that eating leafy, green vegetables may significantly lower the risk of oral cancer among female smokers. Researchers found that for every portion of green leafy vegetables, the risk of oral cancer among current smoking women gets reduced in comparison to women who have given up or never smoked before.

One-third of all oral cancer cases appear to be linked to an unhealthy diet. Maintaining a balanced diet of fruit, vegetables and omega 3 suggests a reduction in the risk of oral cancer. This does not mean that eating vegetables will automatically prevent female smokers from getting oral cancer, as tobacco is still the top cause of any type of cancer related to your mouth, but eating greens is the second best way to reduce your risk of oral cancer. The best way is obviously to quit smoking.

The reason leafy vegetables help to reduce the risk of oral cancer in female smokers is because of the protective compounds that fruits and vegetables contain. In the 1990s, it was discovered that a compound found in broccoli (phytochemicals) can reduce the risk of several cancers as well as the toxic effects of the pollutant benzene.

Although oral cancer is more prevalent among men than among women, an increasing number of women are being diagnosed with this disease, with the number of young females affected by oral cancer being at an all-time high.

For more information on how to prevent oral cancer, or to schedule an oral examination to avoid any future oral issues, contact a dentist in Cape Town.