Full Mouth Reconstruction Full Mouth Reconstruction

03 Aug

Full Mouth Reconstruction

Full mouth reconstruction describes the process of rebuilding all of the teeth in both the upper and lower jaws. This process typically involves general or restorative dentists, while it may also incorporate various other dental specialists – such as oral surgeons, orthodontists, endodontists and periodontists.

Patients generally tend to opt for a full mouth reconstruction when teeth have been lost due to decay or trauma, teeth have been fractured or severely worn due to long-term acid erosion or tooth grinding. Occlusion (the bite) might require adjustments when a patient suffers from ongoing jaw, muscle or headaches.

The full mouth reconstruction process.

If you think you need a full mouth reconstruction, your dentist can give you a full oral examination to determine the best treatment option that can be used. Your dentist will determine the extent of your problem by examining the following areas:

Teeth: The restorative procedure you will undergo is determined by the condition of your teeth.

Periodontal (Gum) Tissues: If your gums are unhealthy you may require intensive treatment from a periodontist to create a solid foundation for your newly reconstructed teeth. These treatments could involve soft tissue or bone grafts to build up your gums and underlying jaw bone.

Temporomandibular joints, jaw muscles and occlusion: A normal, painless bite is important to your overall oral health. Therefore, when planning your restoration you need to consider the occlusal changes which might take place. You may require orthodontics or other treatment – like night guards or bite reprogramming orthotic – before the restorative procedure can be performed.

Esthetics: How your lips frame your smile when you laugh, smile or speak should be considered and studied through visual and photographic analysis, as this plays a big role in full mouth reconstruction.

Once your dentists has completed the examination and obtained enough information obtaining to your case, a treatment plan can be developed to correct the problems in your mouth, as well as begin your full mouth reconstruction.

What Procedures Are Needed for Full Mouth Restoration?

Most full mouth reconstructions involve multiple phases and office visits that might take up to 12 months to complete. Depending on your needs, the following procedures may be involved:

  • Prophylactic teeth cleaning and periodontal care.
  • Crown lengthening to expose healthy tooth structure for possible crowns or bridges
  • Orthogenetic surgery to reposition the jaw.
  • Contouring of the gum tissue to create balance and harmony in your smile.
  • Preparation of your natural tooth structure so crowns, bridges or veneers can be placed.
  • Placement of temporary restorations so that you can become accustomed to your new teeth.
  • Placement of permanent restorations, such as crowns or veneers made from ceramic material.
  • Orthodontics (braces) in order to move your teeth into the optimal position for reconstruction.
  • Implant placement and restoration to replace missing teeth and/or anchor bridge restorations.
  • Bone or soft tissue grafting to enhance the stability of your teeth, proposed implants and/or other restorations.

 

Full Mouth Reconstruction Costs and Medical Aid Coverage

Most full mouth reconstruction cases involve all teeth in the mouth, but every case is unique and depends on your clinical situation.

Most medical aid may pay for some costs associated with full mouth reconstruction. This will depend on your diagnosis and the treatment plan your dentist has developed, as well as your medical aid coverage. Third-party financing may be available through your dentist's office to assist you in making affordable monthly payments.